SOCORRO, N.M. March 29, 2012 – Teri Schultz, whose voice is familiar to those who listen to NPR and CBS international radio news reports, have a chance to meet the Brussels-based journalist who regularly reports on global political issues.

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 Teri Schultz reporting from Afghanistan  Courtesy photo

Schultz will speak on “Afghanistan: Is the End Game Winnable?” at 3 p.m. Thursday, April 5, in MSEC 103 on the New Mexico Tech campus.

The Department of Communication Liberal Arts and Social Sciences and Dr. Peter F. Gerity, Vice President of Academic Affairs, are sponsoring Schultz’s visit.

“So many people have come up to me and asked, ‘Is Teri Schultz really coming here?’” said Dr. Barbara Bonnekessen, chair of the CLASS department.

“A lot of people are familiar with her reporting and are looking forward to meeting her and listening to her presentation,” Bonnekessen said.

“We are delighted to have a journalist of such international prominence as Teri Schultz speak to our students, who no doubt can learn a great deal from her workshops and presentation,” said Gerity.

What few radio listeners may not know is that Schultz graduated from Los Lunas High School and New Mexico State University, and once spent a summer working as an intern for El Defensor Chieftain in Socorro under an agreement between the business and the school.

She holds a master’s degree magna cum laude in international relations from the University of Helsinki, and a bachelor’s degree with honors in journalism from NMSU.

Schultz has covered the European Union, NATO and the Benelux region since late 2006, after serving as the State Department reporter/producer for FOX News from 2000 to 2006.

At the State Department, she traveled frequently with Secretary of State Colin Powell, most often to the Middle East and Europe. She also has been a reporter/producer with Reuters Television and a writer with ABC News in Washington.

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 Teri Schultz speaking to a communications class at her alma mater, New Mexico State University, in 2011. NMSU Photo by Christine Peterson

Schultz lived in Helsinki, Finland, from 1989 to 1997, working as an anchor and reporter for the Finnish Broadcasting Co.’s English-language radio service, and as a freelance reporter/producer for CNN International, and many other international broadcasters. In 2004, Schultz was awarded a Knight International Press Fellowship.

A recent trip to Afghanistan, where she reported for NPR, forms the basis for Schultz’s talk – but she is bringing more than that to campus.

Schultz will give a “Talk-to-Media” workshop on Wednesday, April 4, to graduate students; and on Thursday, April 5, to faculty and department chairs, focusing on how engineers and scientists need to learn how to talk to journalists and politicians.

The art of communication is at the heart of the Technical Communication degree program at Tech, offered through CLASS.

“It’s important to make students aware of the importance of writing,” Bonnekessen said. “As students and future scientists and engineers, they will have to write reports, memos and grant proposals.

“Of course, Teri will be taking this concept one step further,” Bonnekessen said. “Engineers, especially, will be working for transnational companies or with colleagues from all over the world, and need to know how to communicate with people in a multitude of languages.”

Schultz’s visit follows a workshop given in October 2011, also sponsored by CLASS, which featured Valerie Aurora, who graduated from New Mexico Tech with a degree in Computer Science.

Bonnekessen said she would like to develop a formal speakers’ series at the university, and Schultz’s two-day visit marks one step closer to that goal.

For the record, Schultz worked in Socorro in 1985 as a summer intern, starting with coverage of New Mexico Boys State, which met on the New Mexico Tech campus that year, and in providing day-by-day coverage of the then-Hilton Open Golf Tournament, among other assignments. She returned in 1986 as new director at KSRC radio in Socorro.

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By Valerie Kimble/New Mexico Tech